Tuesday, December 11, 2012

The Truth About Innovative Leadership

Every week, we publish an exciting summary of the best articles, videos, events, and posts that relate to innovative management. This week, check out these summaries of GREAT articles that inspire better management. Enjoy!


Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that frightens us. We ask ourselves, “Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented and fabulous?”  Actually, who are you not to be? -  Nelson Mandela

The Truth About Becoming a Great Leader


This is a guest post by Bill McBean, author of The Facts of Business Life: What Every Successful Business Owner Knows that You Don't. The seven facts he presents are clearly articulated in this very straightforward book. He begins by saying that when it comes to business ownership, “the reality is very different from the dream, even when you are successful.” How true. I know when I first started my business over thirty years ago, I had no idea what I was getting into. Here, McBean shares the importance of leadership:

Being a leader sounds like a great thing to be -- and it certainly is. But here is the rub: though the word "leadership" gets tossed around a lot, real, productive leadership is still very uncommon. Now, I'm not quoting any study or research. I'm giving you my opinion based on what I have witnessed over the last four decades of business ownership.

(Neutrinos?) 3.0 Quantic Management : move freely through bureaucracy


Bureaucracy is no match for growing collective intelligence.

Premise : Bureaucracy will never die.
Challenge : How to pass through bureaucratic headwind with minimum resistance?

How to avoid friction with bureaucracy where it sucks value?
It takes a fresh mix of capabilities to deal with an organization at large (deciders, roadblocks, budget etc...).

We aim for new properties that make your dynamicsbarely visible to bureaucratic sensors.
So your entrepreneurship is not drained.

This hack is proposing to progress within the economic space constraints, with adaptive velocity.
"Quantic" is a personal new word for "Quantum+Frantic " dynamics.

It is a "Darwin" adaptation to complexity, with a leap from 1.0 Management beyond 2.0 actual limits. .
Practical examples are given.

It is some kind of Quantum bet, at the instant level (leadership decision).
Odds for additional efficiency are demonstrated.

It refers to quantum world because using explanations about interactions, quite difficult to visualize .
Something simple made complicated, for obscure reasons, at first sight.

What Being an "Authentic Leader" Really Means

Being an effective manager requires that you behave authentically. "Why?" you might ask. "Maybe the 'real me' isn't the most effective boss, but if I can just act the way an effective boss should act and get good results, what's wrong with that?"


In my experience, two things are wrong with that, and they both amount to the same thing: It almost certainly won't work. First, it won't work because, sooner or later, the people who work for you and with you will see through it. Even if your leadership and your instructions are sensible and productive people will feel uncomfortable with someone who doesn't really mean what he or she says.


Second, trying to act like a different kind of person than you really are won't work because you yourself will not be able to keep it up day after day, year after year. Your words and your body language as well as your actions and decisions will reveal that you are not what you present yourself to be and people will be more and more reluctant to trust you as a leader. In both ways, then, "authenticity" is as much a practical virtue as an ethical one. You simply won't be able to lead effectively if people perceive you as disingenuous.

Balancing as an Everyday Skill

Recognizing the core issue of balance in all situations makes it easier to see balance in your own work and life. Things are rarely either/or, but contain parts of both opposing views. Looking for this in every situation becomes second nature with practice as with any skill or habit.

Implementing Intrapreneurship: A Structural and Cultural Approach

Present age organizations face a very complex and uncertain environment. In order to remain innovative and viable in the long run, many organizations are turning to “intrapreneurship.” However, what is intrapreneurship? How different it is from entrepreneurship? What can an organization do to promote intrapreneurship?

In the Graziadio Business Review article “Implementing Intrapreneurship: A Structural and Cultural Approach” the difference between entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship is first illustrated by defining the two terms formally. Entrepreneurship refers to the process of creating innovative new business ventures[1] or just of creating new business ventures.[2] An entrepreneur is the owner of such a business venture.[3] [4] [5] Intrapreneurship refers to the process of new venture creation, strategic renewal, and innovation by employees within an organization.[6] Intrapreneurs, then, are the employees of an organization who realize a creative idea and turn it into an innovation or new business venture.[7] [8] [9]

Then, the GBR article devotes the majority of its main content to the discussion of what an organization can do to promote intrapreneurship. Research has shown that given the right environment and amount of support, many employees can become intrapreneurs. To encourage intrapreneurial activities, it is proposed in the article that organizations have to make sure that the top management creates a clear vision that promotes and encourages innovation and communicates it clearly to all employees. In addition, support from all managers in an organisation is also necessary.

70 Ways to be a better leader

The 70 tips below make for a good list for learning how to become a better leader when you don't have a lot of time to read books about leadership.

And, if you've been a leader for a long time, how about taking a few minutes to run through the list and scoring yourself on how well you carry out each leadership skill?
  1. Don't micromanage
  2. Don't be a bottleneck
  3. Focus on outcomes, not minutiae
  4. Build trust with your colleagues before a crisis comes
  5. Assess your company's strengths and weaknesses at all times
  6. Conduct annual risk reviews
  7. Be courageous, quick and fair
  8. Talk more about values more than rules
  9. Reward how a performance is achieved and not only the performance
  10. Constantly challenge your team to do better
  11. Celebrate your employees' successes, not your own


If You can Dream it, You can Do It

Walt Disney's creative thinking strategies.
Walt Disney was a high school dropout who suffered several business disasters and bankruptcy.  He overcame his personal and financial challenges by using his imagination to create an entertainment empire that has touched the hearts, minds and emotions of all of us.  He summarized his creativity in one word: Imagineering. The term "Imagineering" combines the words imagination and engineering. Imagineering enabled him to transform the dreams, fantasies and wishes of his imagination into concrete reality.
Disney's thinking strategy involved exploring something using three different perceptual positions.

An insight into these positions comes from the comment made by one of his animators that: “Disney's thinking technique synthesized three different strategies: the dreamer, realist, and the critic. A dreamer without a realist is often not able to translate fantasies into tangible reality. A dreamer and critic become engaged in constant conflict. A dreamer and realist can create things but find that a critic helps to evaluate and refine the final products.”

Invisible Umbrella repels raindrops with air

Designers Je Sung Park and Woo Jung Kwon, have developed a unique umbrella that only consists of the handle and nothing else. The ‘Air Umbrella’ is a simple electronic device that takes in air from the bottom of the controller, and shoots it out at the top to create a ‘curtain’ of air that can repel raindrops.

Finding the next Disruptor before it finds you

An interview with Maxwell Wessel, fellow at the Forum for Growth and Innovation and coauthor of the article Surviving Disruption.

Mayan hysteria so widespread, NASA publishes a debunker



Implementing Intrapreneurship: A Structural and Cultural Approach

Present age organizations face a very complex and uncertain environment. In order to remain innovative and viable in the long run, many organizations are turning to “intrapreneurship.” However, what is intrapreneurship? How different it is from entrepreneurship? What can an organization do to promote intrapreneurship?

In the Graziadio Business Review article “Implementing Intrapreneurship: A Structural and Cultural Approach” the difference between entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship is first illustrated by defining the two terms formally. Entrepreneurship refers to the process of creating innovative new business ventures[1] or just of creating new business ventures.[2] An entrepreneur is the owner of such a business venture.[3] [4] [5] Intrapreneurship refers to the process of new venture creation, strategic renewal, and innovation by employees within an organization.[6] Intrapreneurs, then, are the employees of an organization who realize a creative idea and turn it into an innovation or new business venture.[7] [8] [9]

Then, the GBR article devotes the majority of its main content to the discussion of what an organization can do to promote intrapreneurship. Research has shown that given the right environment and amount of support, many employees can become intrapreneurs. To encourage intrapreneurial activities, it is proposed in the article that organizations have to make sure that the top management creates a clear vision that promotes and encourages innovation and communicates it clearly to all employees. In addition, support from all managers in an organisation is also necessary.

LinkedIn Launches An Incubator To Turn Employees Into Entrepreneurs

LinkedIn has launched [in]cubator, a program that allows any company employee with an idea to organize a team and pitch their project to executive staff once a quarter. Those whose ideas are greenlit by cofounder Reid Hoffman and CEO Jeff Weinr, among others, then get up to three months to spend developing that project.
[in]cubator is a more evolved version of the company's "hackdays," in which employees work on various creative projects one Friday a month. So far, LinkedIn says it's approved five [in]cubator projects, including a tool called go/book, a meeting booking system the company is currently using internally.

In MLB.com Challenge, College Students Pitch Tech Ideas

The MLB.com College Challenge, a competition cosponsored by the Syracuse University's School of Information Studies and Major League Baseball Advanced Media, offers participants a chance to solve some of MLB.com's real-world tech challenges, and an opportunity to pitch solutions to MLB representatives. The challenge encourages students from varied backgrounds to participate, serving as a model for helping students find jobs, as well as encouraging technological innovation to flourish in more places. In a previous competition, the winning project presented a way to merge all of the social media documents that a single game might produce, including smartphone photos, tweets, and Facebook status updates, into a single interface. This year's competition, which recently completed its third edition, focused on how MLB.com could harness the trend of "gamification" to engage fans. The winning project was a novel approach to fantasy baseball with gamification elements and competitive social challenges to share the experience with friends. Syracuse professor Jeffery Rubin, one of the competition's organizers, notes the hackathon is an interdisciplinary challenge. "It's not the most technical project that wins--but the best idea," Rubin says.

Frog’s 20 Tech Trends for 2013

With 13 offices spread across the world, the designers, strategists and technologists that make up the world offrog have a unique global perspective on trends that effect business, culture and innovation. For the second year in a row, frog has leveraged this global footprint by asking 20 of their own people, "to take a look to the future. The near future that is." Compiled for your end-of-year contemplation are reflections on the technology trends that will affect all of us in 2013. These technologies are, "highly feasible, commercially viable, and are bubbling up to the surface of the global zeitgeist."
Interesting insights:
  • The Dawn of Robotic Handicraft (and the artisanal handset arrives) - Jonas Damon, Creative Director, New York
  • Faces Become Interfaces - Jan Chipchase, ECD of Global Insights, San Francsico
  • Data Ecology Becomes More Diverse - Scott Nazarian, Creative Director, Seattle
  • The Experience Economy Comes of Age - Kalle Buschmann, Senior Interaction Designer, Munich

You can see the full presentation here.

Scientists Discover Children’s Cells Living in Mothers’ Brains

It is remarkable that it is so common for cells from one individual to integrate into the tissues of another distinct person. We are accustomed to thinking of ourselves as singular autonomous individuals, and these foreign cells seem to belie that notion, and suggest that most people carry remnants of other individuals. As remarkable as this may be, stunning results from a new study show that cells from other individuals are also found in the brain. In this study, male cells were found in the brains of women and had been living there, in some cases, for several decades.

The best psychology books of 2012


  1. The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion 
  2. Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain
  3. The Wisdom of Psychopaths by psychologist Kevin Dutton
  4. Inconvenient People: Lunacy, Liberty and the Mad Doctors of Victorian England by Sarah Wise
  5. Internal Time: Chronotypes, Social Jet Lag, and Why You’re So Tired by Till Roenneberg
  6. Dorling Kindersley's The Psychology Book
  7. The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg.
  8. Far From the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity by Andrew Solomon
  9. The Guardian published a list of the best psychology books of the year, highlighting Beyond Human Nature by Jesse J Prinz
  10. Pieces of Light: The New Science of Memory by psychologist Charles Fernyhough
  11. The Hour Between Dog and Wolf: Risk-taking, Gut Feelings and the Biology of Boom and Bust, by John Coates
  12. James Gleick's The Information won this year's Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books